Skip to main content

About your Search

20121201
20121231
STATION
CSPAN 15
CSPAN2 8
MSNBCW 8
CNNW 7
CNBC 4
KPIX (CBS) 2
MSNBC 2
FBC 1
KCSM (PBS) 1
KQED (PBS) 1
KRCB (PBS) 1
KRON (MyNetworkTV) 1
WETA 1
WJLA (ABC) 1
LANGUAGE
English 57
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 57 (some duplicates have been removed)
in germany or alabama. want them in lexington, kentucky or china? >> you mentioned germany. volkswagen opened a plant in chattanooga a few months ago, 2,000 new jobs. bob corcoran was down there. 2,000 jobs, every one of which started at $14.50 an hour. >> right. they're not all going to be at -- >> so volkswagen was moving these jobs here because we're the low wage country compared to germany. >> dude, are you suggesting we push these jobs away? >> i'm not. >> i would rather americans have a shot at a $17 an hour job than having it in china. >> i agree. >> find a way to do better. i actually agree with you. but you have to understand the consequences are pretty severe for american lifestyles. >> again, though, i'm sorry, mike, but the consequences are, we have two choices, we can't get 1965 wages, we either have these jobs in china or lexington, either have them in alabama or germany and this is at least for some of -- a chance for younger americans to get some good jobs. >> joe, if you're taking a job that pays $14.50 an hour. it means one of two things, a, you don't have a job so you're ge
that account for rising income inequality in canada or, indeed, even in france, in germany, in the united kingdom? i mean, it's happening all over the world, it's also happening in emerging markets. but i think it is important to face that scary because if you see it just as a political phenomenon, you know, you're going to lose sight of what i think is the biggest challenge which is that these, actually, quite benign economic forces, right? i love the technology revolution, i'm a google addict. they're also drivers of social and political consequences which are not quite so benign. the way i like to look at it, and this is a quote from peter orszag, is, you know, how he sees it is he said, look, the big drivers are probably these economic forces, but the issue is that particularly in the united states the politics instead of trying to mitigate these very powerful economic forces has exacerbated them. so even as you have these economic forces creating much, much more concentration at the very top, you expect politics to sort of try to so much that blow. social institutions to soften that
? >> chuck hagel was not to go to vietnam. he had orders to go to germany. he was at fort dix. he said i want to go to vietnam. in may and talk to the chaplain and psychologist, and after two weeks, he went to vietnam. he fought for his country, unlike his critics. he has bled for his country, unlike his critics. he understand war, unlike his critics. he did not have other priorities, like richard cheney, and never said it was going to be a cakewalk. he is prepared, ready, and bill cohen put it best. he has fought and bled for this country. he knows the subject matter. ask jim jones and other national security advisers. >> iraq and iran, that is what upsets people about shock hegel and some of the things he had to say about them. >> he was a supporter of the war in iraq. he supported the war in afghanistan. he voted in favor. it is an odd dove. all the critics are now decrying that he supported these wars. now when it came time to redeem what is it pay losing war in iraq with the troop surge, he not only opposed it, he said it would be the worst disaster since the vietnam war, but it was a su
to germany. he was at fort d, new jersey and said i wanted to go to vietnam. they made him talk to the chaplain and pchologist. after two weeks, he went to vietnam. he has fought for his countntry unlike his critics. he has bled for his country unlike his critics. hehe understands war, unlike hisis critics. he does not have other incentives like dick cheney. he is prepared and r ready. bill cohen said it best. he has fought and bled for thisis country. he knows the subject matter. ask jim jones and other national securitydvisers. >> iraq and iran, that is what upsets people about huck hagel. >> he supported the war in iraq, voted in favor, and supported the war in afghanistan. it is an odd de that supported the two were that all the critics are now crying. he also, when it camtime to dean what was a losing war in iraq with the surge, he not only opopposed it he said it would be the worst disaster since the vinam war, and it was actually a success. >> he has other problems thate will have to address. references that heade to gays, he will have to talk about the reference to the j
was not to go to vietnam. he had orders to go to germany. he was at fort dix, new jersey and said i wanted to go to vietnam. in may and talk to the chaplain and psychologist and after two weeks, went to vietnam. he has fought for his country, unlike his critics. he has but pours countries, unlike his critics. he understands war, unlike his critics. he does not have other priorities, as richard cheney did at the same time in vietnam. he never said it was going to be a cakewalk. he is prepared, ready, and bill, and put it best. he has fought for his country and but for his country. he knows the subject matter. ask jim jones and other national security advisers. >> two words, iraq and have -- iran. that is what upsets people about chuck a calamity had to say about those two. >> he supported the war in iraq, voted in favor and supported the war in afghanistan and is an odd dove that supported the two wars and all the critics are now decrying. he also, when it came time to redeem what was a losing war in iraq with the troop surge, he not only opposed it, he said it would be the worst disaster since t
indeployment of the patriot missile batteries from u.s., germany and netherlands. this would serve to be a pretty firm warning to the flailing assad regime to mess with nato member, turkey. if you talk to some of most vocal critics, though of the proposal, and that would be the russians who are in brussels at that nato meet and who were here, putin in istanbul, meeting with turkish leadership yesterday, they argue further militarizing this long border will only serve to escalate tensions. >> all right. ivan, thanks so much. ivan watson in istanbul, who is being down near that bordertown that has been the subject of shelling. moving on. before the scandal broke, many people could have seen former cia director david patreaus running for office. and now there is news that he was indeed approached. the way he was approached may surprise you. >>> also -- israel standing firm on its decision to go forward with construction of new settlements in the west bank and east jerusalem. hear what that might mean for the middle east peace process if that even exists. and when you switch from anoth
germany. were these regimes possible because of the uniformity? if that is the case, how did the myriad number of protestant denominations in the united states provide a unique defense against tyranny? >> i would not say -- i was not referring to just the soviet union and nazi germany. communist china killed far more of those two tyrannies combined, with no christian heritage to speak of. there are serious scholars that makes serious arguments that there is something and luther's temperament that was germanic. he was no democrat. the more, the merrier. religious factions or alternative sources of social authority. what you want is a society in which the state does not monopolized social authority. >> you talked extensively about religion in the united states contributing to [inaudible] there is one particular force that think they can inflict their views on this country. they insist said it was the intention of the founding fathers to create a christian equivalent of iran, which i do not think is the case. just because you are religious, it does not make you write all the time. >> get i
morning. all right. coming up new at 10, germany's chancellor angela merkel says europe will have to work very hard to it maintain its current standard of living. at the top of the hour, find out what she's saying about welfare and here is another development from overseas. we brought you the story last week, french actor gerard depardu, he is leaving home, leaving france because of higher taxes and handed in his passport. now, the french prime minister has some choice words for mr. depardu. he's obviously in the happy with him and find out exactly what he said at ten o'clock eastern time this morning. time is money. 30 seconds, here is what else we've got for you, an in japan, again, a landslide win, so, what's the new prime minister going to do about the world's worst debt problem? print more money and stimulate more, too. build more infrastructure. will that work? we have our own resident japan expert. question, is jeff immelt's cozy relationship with the president costing general electric shareholders money? we will be discussing it. and i lost on friday when i questioned "the washing
" and "homeland" are popular not just in germany and u.k. but in jordan and turkey. "24" is a huge hit in iran. it's beamed in illegally by -- you're not getting paid for it? >> no. but i do think. >> but it's smuggled in a lot. the actor is persian and has a lot of connections in iran and he's been tracking "homeland" in iran. >> it is stuningly popular but i've read a few criticisms of the show and to the extent that we make piss people off on every side of the aisle and are embraced by them too is a good thing. one thing i did learn is that as an export, as a public face, we do have some responsibility, some influence on -- this is an american export and we are good at this. we make really good movies and television shows. it is what the world sees of us. and there was a book by a researcher at the gallop organization and they polled people in egypt what is your feeling about americans. i don't like america but i like americans. and a very small percentage had never met an american. and they said how dow know and the answer was "friends". >> based on that i like america too. >> politics dem nie
by better than seven points and the nasdaq futures up, as well, by about 17. european shares rising. germany is up, the ftse is up, the france, the cac in france has turned slightly down. but, again, this is a marginal loss of about three points. most of the major asian stock markets were higher overnight. and among the catalyst here, signs that china's recovery is gaining traction. sources say that the bank of japan will ease monetary policy this week and consider adopting a 2% inflation target no later than january. policymakers are seen responding to pressure from the incoming prime minister there. shinzo abe for stronger efforts to beat deflation. in the meantime, india's central bank kept interest rates on hold yesterday ignoring pressure to reduce borrowing costs. policymakers said they were shifting the focus to reducing the economy and that raises the odds of a rate cut as early as january. andrew olson, over to you. >> ubs reportedly nearing a fine of up to $1.5 billion. the bank is close to finalizing a deal with regulators according to the financial times. about three dozen banker
of this strategy used in germany, of these national manufacturing innovation hubs and i think that ising? we're -- i think that's something we're going to look to promote in a second term and expand further. >> over here. microphone's coming. thank you paul with every child matters. i applaud you for the comments about the need to the to have us fighting against money for children versus money for research and other vital needs in the domestic discretionary bumming. the question is where do we find more revenue? have you considered taxes on stock transfers or transactions or other innovative carbon taxes other kinds of approaches to find new revenue that will be possible for us to not fight amongst ourselves for important resources? >> well, it's going to shock many of you to know that i'm not here to make news on revenues. we are busy fighting right now to make sure we have a budget agreement that's very balanced, and i think that's part of the revenues together with smart entitlement savings. the type of balance is to ma
in the syrian attacks. th germany will send two muscles each. all 6 patriot missiles will be under nato control and should be operational by january. >> special night at the white house and president obama and the first lady celebrated the 6th night of hanukkah. it included traditional prayers and the lighting of candles from a 90-year-old menorah. it was seriously damaged super he storm sandy. it symbolizes perseverance much like the holiday. >> jews honor ever lasting hope that light will over come the darkness, goodness over comes evil and faith can accomplish miracles. >>> the president also america's support for israel remains unshakeable. that is your 5@5:00. >> ending it before it even started u.n. ambassador susan rice taking her name out of running for the secretary of state position. this following months of criticism over her comments on the benghazi attack. peter doocy is following this story from washington and there are so many angles to this one. good morning, peter. >> there are. ambassador susan rice was never actually nominated for the job of secretary of state but based on st
's not from germany. a powerful, fuel-efficient engine, but it's not from japan. ♪ it's a car like no other... from a place like no other. introducing the all-new 2013 chevrolet malibu, our greatest malibu ever. ♪ >>> about 22 past the hour now. the first hint of snow is falling in pennsylvania. it will be heading to the northeast, weather channel meteorologist mike seidel live in new cumberland, pennsylvania. what are you seeing? what do we expect the next couple of days? >> light snow on the pennsylvania turnpike outside of harrisburg. travel fine, not that cold and hasn't snowed that much. this will be the first measurable snowfall for philadelphia. may get an inch of snow. new york city, times square, a couple of inches or so on the grassy services. 5 to 7. a winter storm for boston and snow will fall from dinner time to early on sunday morning. the areas where you got dumped wednesday morning, buffalo, syracuse, look for 3 to 6 inches, not the 10 to 15 you had. the major impact at the airports, already the three new york city airports, newark, laguardia, and kennedy, canceled 180 fli
is it that germany, a country that has 1/4 of the population of the united states, exports more than what the united states does? because if you look at our tax code, that's broken, it needs reform, industries in the united states that are employing americans are given two-year tax credits and we expect those american companies to make generational commitments on a two-year tax credit. you look at places like germany, they're providing 10-year tax credits that sends a signal, a signal of certainty, a signal of clarity to businesses in germany, that there is a commitment to embrace innovation and technology, to remain competitive in the manufacturing economy. manufacturing today is not labor-intensive. it's capital-intensive. you always have to be in a continuous improvement mode. but that requires one thing. it requires a confidence in the american people, a confidence in the american worker, in making the kind of commitments that are necessary to compete with china. i often hear people on this floor, every day, whining about china. yeah, china cheats on their currency. they treat their workers poor
estate in hong kong, and the optics industry in germany? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. advil pm® or tylenol pm. the advil pm® guy is spending less time lying awake with annoying aches and pains and more time asleep. advil pm®. the difference is a better night's sleep. share "not even close." share "you owe me..." share "just right." the share everything plan. sharable data across 10 devices with unlimited talk and text. get a droid razr m by motorola for $49.99. >>> typically a doomsday plan, it is meant to help you survive the thing that happens after doomsday. during the cold war, the u.s. had a doomsday plan meant to protect the president and ensure the continued functions of the u.s. government. in the event of a nuclear attack. so nuclear attack, your doomsday happens
of germany or they would have use trees from maine and new england and new hampshire. it is not a tree place any more. they have cut down a lot of trees so this forest is an american forest coming into the harbor. but the thing about saying that you know, i'm sort of having a hard time because i don't want to say -- do i want to say hey look, all this happened here and just as so many things happened everyplace, but i don't want to champion probably a the chair will be thrown. i don't want to say the new york landscape is more important than any other landscape. i want to say that it was crucial and that the battle, that it all happened here and i don't want to say we ignored it. we shouldn't ignore these losses of people and we should think about celebrating what we have learned. >> you make a great point in the book that one of the reasons washington isn't crashed is because -- [inaudible] >> the marblehead sailors. the people from massachusetts who understand water and you know, for instance when they cross -- >> they are routed in brooklyn. >> white plains happens this week. if you go up
the unions we deserve. if when you work with them in other countries like germany, you get more cooperative unions. so i do think that the destruction of unions in this country has been one of the main reasons that the labor share of the pie has been shrinking. that's problematic to me. >> john, from the right, can you explain why it looks like to the casual observer here that organized labor is getting kneecaped in michigan? >> i think the problem is neither side understands himself. big business and small business is facing barrier after barrier. losing manufacturing jobs to everywhere. at the same time, i think republicans haven't done a good enough job to understand the lives of hardworking americans and how their life is tough and their take home pay is tougher. both sides really just don't understand each other and they have to come together or we're going to lose more jobs. >> perception being reality and both sides not understanding each other. what is the reality that comes from the perception of seeing almost 10,000 people on the steps there in michigan and knowing the governor is
with an average of 182 in germany. 10,000 987 compared with an average of 182 in germany, 75 in spain and 47 in the united kingdom. mexico, their average about 5,980 annual homicides, still half of ours by firearms during that same period. colombia was higher. an executive director of the chicago crime lab has said that this is an outliar and lethal violence. other countries have similar rates of rape and battery but said because so much american violence includes guns, includes guns, the rate of death of so much higher. steady gun violence leads especially, young blacks and latino men are likely to die in a shooting. each year from 2006 to 2010, homicide is the leading cause of death for african-american males from ages 15 to 24 more than the next nine causes of death combined according to the ces for disease control and prevention. gun violence is part of a complex cycle born of poverty and residential segregation as is poor health and substandard education, which all are related to the poverty and the persistent gun violence. challenges that the nation has yet to truly face and address. a
to europe first. the policy of germany first then japan had to be worked out. which is why churchill was in washington that month. i think americans always liked churchill. he had been speaking in america for 20 years. was american. guest: his mother was american. he was well known on the lecture circuit and now here he is as prime minister. they were familiar with him. i think he came out of that speech that day knowing he had an ally and americans took a liking to him because they were very wary of churchill that all he wanted were his colonies become. b not liberty or not roosevelt's four freedoms but to recapture everything the japanese had taken from him by using american boys and that americans resented and they were wary of that host: we are about out of time. when did you finish this? guest: early this year? host: early 2012? guest: yes. and about six months of copy editing and final editing with bill phillips. host: out of all the characters in it besides winston chump if you were -- churchill if you were going it write another book who would it be? guest: admiral king come
've heard from germany and also the netherlands agreeing to send some patriot missile batteries there as well along with troops as well. you're looking about 1200 troops between the three countries. you want to contain it. so far you've been pretty good keeping it within the borders of syria. if it spills over you're looking at area already racked by war for two years. what can happen then? they want to make sure that doesn't. we'll watch that. alisyn: next three weeks obviously will be critical. we're just getting started here. we have a heartbreaking story of heroism linked to the horrible oregon mall shooting. we'll talk about a man who put his own life to try to save another. bill: a former u.s. marine locked up in mexico on what his family call as trumped up charge. the desperate plea for the government's help and serious concerns now that his life is in danger. >> i asked you to continue to pray for him. we got a call from him last night. he's just in a really tough situation because it's public in mexico at this point. so we are praying that you will pray for his protecti
, when eastern germany and eastern europe. from her historical narrative on the iron curtain tonight at 8:00 on c-span's q&a. host: we are joined by matt kibbe, president and ceo of freedomworks. . seeing some speculation that speaker boehner may be willing to talk about taxes. what do you think speaker boehner needs to do? how much confidence do you have in representing the republican party perspective? guest: taxes will go up automatically. spending, the sequester, will happen unless republicans act. it is literally true that republicans do not have the ability to stop all the tax increases unless the president goes along with it. that said, taxes will only go up when it is a bipartisan solution. they need republicans to raise taxes. i think john boehner would make a huge mistake in raising taxes. we need to change the conversation and get rid of all the credit capitalism in the tax code. let's not do this in the discussion of punishing some people. host: what the think of the speaker's role in these negotiations? how does freedomworks feel about the agenda he's bringing to the table? h
instantly. all the police in germany had trained dogs on the street. there were no robberies or assaults because people know that the dog would get them. the security is not working. children and adults need to be protected. it would be safer to have trained dogs in every school and the malls and big theater complexes. host: we got your points. guest: i am not sure it would be less expensive to have a handle and a dog. i grew up much of my life in europe. i understand they have strict gun control laws there. the top three in terms of fatalities until friday were in britain and germany. those were often used with assault weapons. people can get access to these weapons. host: this comes from twitter. there were some graphics this morning from "the washington post." the ban on assault weapons includes massachusetts, maryland, new york, and hawaii. 30 states require -- host: what do you make of the mental health requirements and awaiting periods? what about tightening those laws? guest: i think they will be on the table. there is probably a loophole in the system. on the concealed carry issu
, her son raymond was killed in the korean war while a third son served in west germany in the same war. no mother should have to lose two sons to war. but her family's sacrifice will forever be part of history and i ask that we pass this bill with no reservation. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady reserves. the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. farenthold: thank you, mr. speaker. at this time i yield such time as he may consume to my distinguished colleague from the state of michigan, mr. benishek. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognize. mr. benishek: i come to the floor today to urge my colleagues to support my legislation, h.r. 4378, a bill to name the post office building in munising, michigan, after the late mrs. elizabeth kinnunen. her story is that like many across this nation, she came to america as an immigrant to to have a better life. she came to the united states in 1903 and married oscar in 1909. they had seven children and worked hard all their life to ensure their children would have a shot at the american dream. t
germany. >>> it's the top of the hour. you're in the "cnn newsroom." i'm martin savidge. let's a pleasure to be with you. >>> right now in the nation's capital, senators are working to try to keep all of us from going off that fiscal cliff. we've been talking about that for what seems like, well, forever. they've got to reach a deal by new year's day. here's what's happening right now. senate leaders on both sides are trying to reach a budget deal hoping to avert a 2% hike in everyone's paychecks early next year. plus 2 million unemployed people stand to lose their jobless benefits. jessia yellen, the president says he's optimistic but he sure had a firm tone after meeting with the senate and house leaders yesterday. let's just give that a listen. >> so the american people are watching what we do here. obviously, their patience is already thin. this is deja vu all over again. america wonders why it is that in this town for some reason, you can't get stuff done in an organized timetable. why everything always has to wait till the last minute. well, we're now at the last minute. and the ame
tradition here in germany and a symbol of good luck, specially if you touch the buttons on the chimney sweeper's coat. happy new year from germany! dangerous weather across america this morning. live pictures of a massive 20-car pile-up that shut down a highway because of ice and this is just the beginning. it was another silent night in washington coming from the nation's leader on both sides of the aisle. one week to go until the country falls off the fiscal cliff. how much is too much when it comes to christmas spirit? take a look at this. neighbors have had enough of this 65,000-light display. but the woman behind it says, it's not going her. and we're going to talk to her live. her name is jan stuart from california and she's up early for us. good morning, merry christmas. i'm in new york. i'm alina cho. >> "starting point" begins right now. >>> and our "starting point" this morning a dangerous winter storm creating holiday travel hazards. new this hour, we're getting word of a pile-up involving at least 20 cars and a big-rig on an interstate 40 west outside of oklahoma city. the
in the u.s., real estate in hong kong, and the optics industry in germany? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. >> brian: an after math of an over night bomb in kabul, stan stan. a u.s. militarior - military contractor. carolina panth thers - panthers celebrates and all of the sudden the guard rail collapses . no word yet on if anybody was hurt. gretch. >> gretchen:, brian. house speaker john boehner removing a stumbling block. raising tax rate for those making a million or more? could this seal a deal with the white house. hold your horses. this is far from a done deal. >> this is a very important shift. speaker boehner is retreating on an issue principle and said you can raise tax rates on wealthy people . previously he said we'll get more money out of limiting deductions. it is an
aircraft. but this move part of a nato response. also supplied by germany and holland whose parliament last week approved their contributions. the u.s., though, of course, putting a number of people on the ground. many observers saying that now nato has physical troops and presence in the area that it risks somehow being dragged into this particular conflict. everybody is stressing these are purely there to defend turkey, a staunch nato member. john? >> they still come as the u.s. offered diplomatic recognition to the rebels in syria and with 400 u.s. troops there, it does give the u.s. some skin in this game. >> reporter: absolutely. i don't think the troops will be involved. skin in the game, certainly. the obama administration though many say caught between two different sides here. at the same time, the day before they gave some kind of lower level diplomatic recognition to the syrian government. the day before that they were a terror group, one of the more hard line parts of the rebel front responsible for many victories, considered islamic hard-liners. to many degrees they're heroes b
protect their own ground forces? is there something about germany and italy and france and spain and england and japan that renders them genetically incapable of having their own air forces? i know we were told, well, we have to stay in iraq and afghanistan because they don't have any air force. well, neither do the people attacking them. the next thing we are told is, well, we need to protect the u.s. from a nuclear attack. i agree. we have a nuclear capacity that far exceeds any potential combination of enemies. we had during the height of the cold war the triad. we could destroy the soviet union and they had a capacity to go after us by missiles, submarines or the strategic air command. i have a proposal, sometimes i'm kidding, this time i'm not. can we not go to the pentagon and say, you know what? now that there is no more soviet union, there is a much weaker russia, and i agree, russia won a war against georgia. they won a war against the country of georgia. i think the way we have armed the state of georgia, i'm not sure what the outcome would be if that was the war. but r
. the nine states in germany are the only two countries to reduce their carbon dioxide pollution. that amounts to two, 4 million lbs. of carbon dioxide released into the air every single second. >> if you have found yourself using social media in the bathroom. you are not the only one. a new report out today shows that one- third of the heaviest social media users ages 18-24 ssi such as facebook and twitter in the back up. ages 35-34 our bathroom--35-44 both sexes are likely to use social networks and beckham. social in the back on. >> we will see how bad is that the morning commute goes on. taking a double live look outside from our roof camera on the left and our bay bridge cam on the right. we're looking at filing some dry conditions as you make your way on the road. how long will the dry weather last. it may not be much longer. let us get the fed is on your forecast. >> we are looking had an increase in a cloud cover to day. head of another storm system to stay until wednesday. and expect a mix of sun and clouds. temperatures in the upper 50s coast side. the low sixties for m
to -- i read about them slicing trees together from north to germany to meet some transactions, or there would have used trees from maine. from new england, new hampshire. massachusetts is pretty much not a tree place anymore. if cut down a lot of trees. so this forest is an american forest coming into the harbor. but the thing about saying that, some sort of having a hard time because i don't want to say -- i want to say, hey, look. all this happened here. and just as so many things happened in every place, but i don't want to champion pro way @booktv chair will be thrown. i don't want to say that the new york landscape is more important than any other landscape. i want to say that it was crucial and that the battle, and all happened here. i want to say that we ignore it because of the losses and defeats. we should not ignore them. we should think about celebrating what we learn. >> i think? a great point in the book about weather in landscape and what other reasons washington is not conscious, river because men from marble had. >> the marble head sailors. the people from mass
in germany and poland and it is all over the place. in fact, there are 3,000 books on the internet talking about this. it has become a cash cow for people who want to cash in on this doomsday scenario. but, hey, look, look up in the sky. the sky is not on fire. we're not falling into a black hole. we're not colliding with planet x. in fact, it is raining and snowing for god's sake. >> and the mayan calendar, even the mayans don't believe it is the end of the world today. the mayan calendar, there is a new calendar that starts. we start all over, right? after today? >> it is cyclic. many of the indigenous people live close to nature. the winter solstice is the end and they hijacked it in order to promote book sales. >> let's all celebrate. we're all alive and the world has not come to an end. thank you very much. good to see you as always. "cnn newsroom" continues now with brooke baldwin. hey, brooke. >> suzanne, thank you so much. i'm brooke baldwin. huge news day. a lot to get to including the president's big announcement, saw it here on cnn, moments ago. senator john kerry tapped to repl
them. laws in the u.s. don't apply to a hacking group in germany, for example. >> talk about the bigger issue. cyber security in general, because as you know leon panetta said earlier this year the next pearl harbor might be through cyber warfare. >> yeah. >> is this something that at this point people recognize? is the problem getting worse or better? >> the potential for a major strike, this pearl harbor idea he's put out there, that is not hyperbole. this could be the most efficient ay for those who want to strike our government and society or any other because it doesn't require the physical manifestations of previous terrorism where you have to go disrupt infrastructure take over aircraft do physical destruction. you can stay in your own country, reach out for almost no cost, and deploy software that can bring down utilities, hospitals. worst of all, it could squirrel financial markets. i don't think anything is a higher risk than the ability of going after financial markets and subtly causing problems not turning out the lights on the nyse but jus
lott is in the air force, he's been stationed in germany the last three years. he said there were no words what it was like to see his family again. i would agree. >> that's a huge moment for a family. >> welcome back to "cbs this morning," everyone. >>> let's say you got a smartphone for christmas, well you're probably learning how to use it today, but how much is it learning about you? sharyl attkisson has an eye-opening look how your smartphone is watching almost everything you do. >> reporter: with more than a billion smartphone users, revenue from applications could soon reach $100 billion, a lot of them like flickar and instagram can turn your phone into a studio. but some have little ideas what may be sent along with the photos. do you have any idea what your smartphone collects and does in applications? >> not really not really. >> reporter: we're going to take a photograph of you and see if our expert can find it based on just the photograph. our expert is jason hong a mobile privacy specialist at carnegie melon institute. he's waiting at our washin
. they no longer have much in common with one another. >> more on life and soviet east germany sunday night at 8:00 on c-span's "q&a." >> punched me, to me, take things from me. >> he is not safe on that bus. >> i have been on that bus and they are as good as gold. >> all of us were starting to see people coming out and talking about their experience of this phenomenon that so many of us have experienced in one way or another and have no words for, other than adolescents. finally, people are starting to stand back and say, this is not actually a normal part of growing up. this is not a normal right of passage. there was a moment where there was a possibility for change. we decided to start the film out of that feeling that voices were bubbling up. coming up to the surface to say, this is not something we can accept any more as a normal part of our culture. >> the filmmaker has followed up for award winning film by gathering essays. -- her toward women -- her award winning film by gathering essays. >> the fiscal cliff negotiations, with particular attention to social security. we spoke to an asso
-800-345-2550 after that, it's on to germany. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 then tonight, i'm trading 9500 miles away in japan. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 with the new global account from schwab, tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 i hunt down opportunities around the world tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 as if i'm right there. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and i'm in total control because i can trade tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 directly online in 12 markets in their local currencies. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 i use their global research to get an edge. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 their equity ratings show me how schwab tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 rates specific foreign stocks tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 based on things like fundamentals, momentum and risk. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and i also have access to independent tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 firms like ned davis research tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and economist intelligence unit. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 plus, i can talk to their global specialists 24/7. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and trade in my global account commission-free tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 through march 2013. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 best part... no jet lag. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 call 1-800-790-3801
. germany's economic position is arguably deteriorating but still schauble there is relatively optimistic that the crisis is over. in the meantime what is also happening is this money is beginning to flow into, from the public safety net to support the banks so you have the recapitalization of the banks but that isn't of course good news for everybody in the case of the ipo from last year you have 53,000 small shareholders there effectively having their positions in the debt smashed against the whole. they've been selling out again today to try and retrieve what they can because it is in the negative equity and arguably they'll get nothing as we go through the motions further down the line. it lost another 25% of what is left of the market capitalization today. a number of the other spanish banks are also in negative territory and some of the spanish big industrials are also down today. under performance on madrid. just got to mention where we are on the greek banks. they are now going through a position where the central bank is saying we think they need 27, 28 billion euros. the questio
by about 2029 -- to outgrow skwroeupl -- to outgrow germany by 2029. none of us is going to suggest that every issue with respect to russia has been resolved. we know there are still points of tension, and some of them in the foreign policy area are very relevant today. for instance, over syria. we understand that. we hope that at recent events, syria may be moving russia and the united states closer in terms of our thinking. but it is only a good thing to bring russia into a rules-based system with mechanisms for peaceful, transparent dispute resolution. there is no debate. and i think the chair knows this full well, that the very tragic and senseless death of anticorruption lawyer sergei magnitsky who died while in russian custody, that those events are simply unacceptable. they're appalling. and it highlights a human rights problem that has grown in its scope, not diminished. it's one we hope to be able to resolve with good relationships and good discussions. senator cardin, a sponsor of that legislation, in the house of the senate is going to speak shortly about it, and i will l
. the majority of whom hailed from ireland and germany. almost half were from ireland alone. in 1855, more than 50% of the population of new york, the first port of call for the majority of immigrants, was foreign-born. but attitudes were changing. toward the end of the 19th sentry, just 1.6% of immigrants were asian. but apparently that was enough to push congress to pass the chinese exclusion act in 1882 restricting immigration from china for ten years. as public opinion turned against certain kinds of immigrants in the early 20th century, more legislative restrictions began to take hold. in 1924, the johnson-reid immigration act created a quota system. it puts caps on the number of immigrants that could come to the u.s. from a particular country. the act also included a provision that made certain immigrants ineligible for citizenship based on race or nationality. by the middle of the 20th septemberry, the face of immigration to the united states had begun to change. by the end of the 1970s, a third of the foreign-born population of the country hailed from latin america. today that trend has
with a pulitzer prize winner on life in soviet east germany, poland, and hungary. from her historical narrative, send a night at 8:00 on c-span. >> "washington journal" continues. host: for the rest of the program, we are going to be talking more about the shooting yesterday in newtown, connecticut at the sandy hook elementary school. 27 victims including 20 children. we have broken down the phone numbers in terms of regions of the country. we have a special line for educators and administrators. if you work in education, give us a call and give us some of your thoughts as to what happened yesterday at the sandy hook elementary school in newtown, connecticut. we've got hte map up there which whos connecticut, hartford the capital. newtown in the southwest corner near the new york border. we will keep putting the numbers up on your screen. we want to show you the front page of the local newspaper. 20 children, six adults fatally shot. adam lanza was identified as the gunman. president obama addresses a grief-stricken nation. "our hearts are broken." showing a picture that has been on a lot of di
since world war ii? i mean, i don't think germany's going to invade france any time soon or russia's going to invade poland. but yet we have a huge amount of deployed american forces in europe. i mean, maybe we need to have a discussion about whether or not we need that. whether or not we can afford that expense. whether or not that does anything to enhance our security. again, i want a military that is the best in the world, i want it to continue to be that way, i want it to be second to none. i want to make sure we have all that we need but i don't want to be investing in things we don't need. and when the joint chiefs of staff and when the secretary of defense and all the experts tell us that they don't need something and we here appropriate money to keep something going that is unnecessary, that is unwanted, at the same time while you're trying to cut the benefits of some poor old lady, her social security, there's something wrong with this equation. we got to start thinking about the security of people here in this country as well. and what we're going to do right after this i
that, it's on to germany. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 then tonight, i'm trading 9500 miles away in japan. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 with the new global account from schwab, tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 i hunt down opportunities around the world tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 as if i'm right there. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and i'm in total control because i can trade tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 directly online in 12 markets in their local currencies. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 i use their global research to get an edge. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 their equity ratings show me how schwab tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 rates specific foreign stocks tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 based on things like fundamentals, momentum and risk. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and i also have access to independent tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 firms like ned davis research tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and economist intelligence unit. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 plus, i can talk to their global specialists 24/7. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and trade in my global account commission-free tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 through march 2013. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 best part... no jet lag. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 call 1-866-294-5409 tdd#:
in jellyfish, impact life expectancy in the u.s., real estate in hong kong, and the optics industry in germany? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. with investment information, risks, fees and expenses social security are just numbers thinkin a budget.d... well, we worked hard for those benefits. we earned them. and if washington tries to cram decisions about the future... of these programs into a last minute budget deal... we'll all pay the price. aarp is fighting to protect seniors with responsible... solutions that strengthen medicare and... social security for generations to come. we can do better than a last minute deal... that would hurt all of us. one is for a clean, wedomestic energy future that puts us in control. our abundant natural gas is already saving us money, producing cl
installed bulbs on the new year's eve ball in times square. and in germany, an animal keeper holds a tomato frog in her hand. hot shots, pictures coming in from around the world. >>> the military puts tremendous time and resources into designing camouflage, and it could soon make them disappear. here's cnn's pentagon correspondent, chris lawrence. >> reporter: camouflage can be the difference between a soldier getting shot and going home. so a lot's riding on the next generation designed to outfit troops. it's only been eight years since the army spent $5 billion on m camo that critics say didn't fool anyone. soldiers complained to the paint where the army abandoned their one size fits all universal pattern. so they were looking for camouflage that they could use everywhere? >> correct. and it didn't work anywhere. >> reporter: guy cramer is one of the designers competing to win the army's next multi-million dollar contract. this summer, he showed us the science behind every shape, size, and shade of these pixels. >> you now have your camouflage. so we're trying to trick the brainseeing t
in washington post regarding medical costs and they have for example appendectomy costs $13,000 but in germany, 3,100, you would think that you would think it is government run so is subsidized but yet they spend 11% of gnp while we spend 17.5%. how do you explain the discrepancy? >> guest: great question. they have a somewhat controlled system over there which i have no doubt has good outcomes knowing germans fidelity to quality and engineering and expectations, we don't have competition. if you read marty makary's book he will find out the reasons why things cost. often times one of the points he makes, we often have physicians with great reputations who all the doctors know are the worst doctors so the question is about having transparency. the third thing is they don't have the court system we have which is tremendously expensive. in my last few years of practice it was costing me $1,000 or $2,000 a day in terms of malpractice costs for baby. that was fully absorber cost so they don't have that, they don't have the rules and regulations we have. there's a lot to be said about what the germ
[ male announcer ] a european-inspired suspension, but it's not from germany. a powerful, fuel-efficient engine, but it's not from japan. ♪ it's a car like no other... from a place like no other. introducing the all-new 2013 chevrolet malibu, our greatest malibu ever. ♪ >>> producer john tower, we have our replacements for fiscal cliff. please only read the clean ones. >> jason writes, money boo boo. calvin, pricey precipice. i like this one. allen, monetary manhole. >> monetary manhole. we're getting stripper names and other categories we don't want to get into. great show, everyone. "morning joe" starts right now. > ♪ and i'm free ♪ free falling >>> you know, it's a special time of the year. we've been looking forward to it for months now. and everywhere you go, you can see the twinkle in little children's eyes because they know that in just a few short weeks, ♪ the fiscal cliff is coming to town ♪ merry cliffmas. and with a dramatic name like fiscal cliff, it's got to be exciting. jim? >> the president's asking for $1.6 trillion in revenue. >> $600 billion in tax
has been used in germany of these national manufacturing innovation hubs. and i think that is something that we are going to look to promote in a second term. >> thank you. paul friedman with every child matters. we are very, i applaud you for your comments about not having is fighting against money for children versus money for research and other vital needs. so the question is where do we find more revenue? and have you considered taxes on stock transfers, stock transactions or other kind of innovative, carbon tax, other kind of approaches were we can find new revenue so that will be possible for us to not fight amongst ourselves for resources? >> well, it's going to shock you for you and industry that i am not here to make news on new revenue. we are busy fighting right now to ensure that we have a budget agreement. it's very balanced and i think part of that balance, having enough high income revenues together with smart entitlement savings. that's the type of balance people talk about the most, but the other type of balance, that you're putting together a package
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 57 (some duplicates have been removed)